Society tteenage dating in britain

Two or three days would be set aside for the presentations, about one to two hundred girls each day, queueing up in their carriages outside St.

James’s Palace (later Buckingham Palace), carrying bouquets and dressed rather like it was their wedding day.

During the Regency and into the Victorian era, the London social season was particularly busy from April to the end of June, but events were held throughout the winter, starting when Parliament returned in late January and included military reviews, dinner parties, and charity events, and went on to the end of July.

By the end of June, London was so hot and smelly, everyone with a country estate would flee, but the coming sewer systems, and grand new neighbourhoods with improved wash rooms, would make the capital all the more bearable by the late 1860s.

Young Queen Victoria happily embraced the gaiety of her uncles George’s and William’s reigns, but grew more prim and proper as she had children, then stricter upon the death of Prince Albert.

A beautiful and talented girl might find a wealthy patroness, perhaps a dowager, to take her to London and show her off.

Certainly the noble débutantes would have looked down their noses at these common girls, but also been jealous of them, especially when they landed a brilliant match.

When a young lady was “out” she immediately started receiving invitations to all the events.

Comments